From the I·CONnect Blog

  • What’s New in Public Law
    by admin on April 6, 2020 at 3:06 am

    –Mohamed Abdelaal, Assistant Professor, Alexandria University Faculty of Law In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the […]

  • ICON Guest Editorial: Without a New European Patriotism, the Decline of the EU is Inevitable
    by admin on April 3, 2020 at 4:57 pm

    On 26 March, an utterly divided EU emerged from the European Council dedicated to European measures aimed at managing the severest crisis since 1929, one far worse  than the 2012-2017 crisis. The coronavirus pandemic and the transpiring economic and social crises present Europe with an extraordinary opportunity: to decide to move towards a […]

  • Redefining the Right to Privacy in the Age of the COVID-19 Pandemic
    by admin on April 2, 2020 at 1:40 am

    —Dr. Olga Hałub-Kowalczyk, Chair of Constitutional Law, Faculty of Law, Administration and Economics, University of Wrocław, Poland Nobody needs to be convinced of the direct impact on human rights flowing from the pandemic induced by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The necessity of reorganizing the state and way it works goes hand in hand […]

  • How COVID-19 Unveils the True Autocrats: Viktor Orbán’s Ermächtigungsgesetz
    by admin on April 1, 2020 at 2:29 pm

    —Gábor Halmai, European University Institute At a conference held at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) in London on 20-21 May 1967, Isaiah Berlin used the term ‘false’ populism, defining it as “the employment of populist ideas for the ends other than those which the populist desired. That is […]

  • What’s New in Public Law
    by admin on March 30, 2020 at 4:06 am

    –Swapnil Tripathi, Attorney, India In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere. To submit relevant […]

  • ICON Editorial: COVID-19 and ICON
    by admin on March 26, 2020 at 2:58 am

    —Gráinne de Búrca & J.H.H. Weiler, Co-Editors-in-Chief, International Journal of Constitutional Law We are pulled in opposite directions in the face of a global upending of normal life. At one level it is reassuring, even if hunkered down at home, as is our editorial team in six different countries, to continue serenely […]

  • A Constitutional Crisis of a Different Kind: Canada’s Slow March Back to Mega-Constitutional Politics
    by admin on March 25, 2020 at 3:41 am

    —Alexander Hudson, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. For more information about our four columnists for 2020, please click here.] It’s difficult to keep working on research with little relevance to the Covid-19 crisis that […]

  • Bolsonarism and COVID-19: Truth Strikes Back
    by admin on March 24, 2020 at 3:29 am

    —Thomas da Rosa de Bustamante & Emilio Peluso Neder Meyer, Federal University of Minas Gerais and Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) In response to the personal offenses and criticism of her critically acclaimed documentary “The Edge of Democracy”, in comments by President Jair […]

  • What’s New in Public Law
    by admin on March 23, 2020 at 5:47 am

    –Pedro Arcain Riccetto, Ph.D. candidate at the University of São Paulo, Brazil In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from […]

  • Dissenting from the Venice Commission on Dissenting Opinions
    by admin on March 21, 2020 at 8:09 pm

    —Maxime Saint-Hilaire, Université de Sherbrooke, Canada & Léonid Sirota, AUT University, New Zealand The topic of separate – concurring or dissenting – judicial opinions is sure to generate attention, and some controversy. There is a substantial academic literature on the subject, to which judges have often […]