THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONSTRUCTION OF REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS AND FAMILY IN CROATIA AND SLOVENIA

Gender equality advancements have been far from straightforward in Croatia in Slovenia since both countries gained independence at the beginning of the 1990s. With a focus on selected constitutional issues relating to reproductive rights and the definition of marriage and parenthood, the paper discusses crucial moments that shaped the constitutional (and societal) position of women and sexual minorities. Chronologically divided into three major parts (starting with the breakup of the SFRY and the ensuing constitutional developments, discussing the EU accession period(s), and concluding with the rise of populism and anti-gender activism in both countries), the paper discusses the advancements and setbacks in the constitutional construction of gender regimes in both countries over the past three decades.