FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, AND CORPORATIONS: INNOVATION OR DEHUMANIZATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS?

Granting rights to non-humans has been a growing stake worldwide in recent years. The Constitution of Ecuador codifies the Rights of Nature, based on the idea of good living. Rivers from India, New Zealand, became right-holders in 2017, with legal personhood recognized. The discussions concerning the bestowing of rights to non-living beings, like AI, robots, are also becoming a vibrating agenda, with great scholarly engagement. This contemporary trend of expanding legal subjectivity to non-humans, although related to new ethical and technological challenges, is permeated by familiar but little assessed promises and pitfalls present in granting constitutional rights to corporations. By discussing the implications of corporations, AI, and other non-humans being considered as bearers of human rights, we highlight the risk of dehumanizing human rights, especially when it threatens the fundamental rights of politically vulnerable groups.