At the origins of illiberal democracy. The relationship between the constitutional socioeconomic status of an individual, populism and the rule of law on the example of Hungary and Poland

Poland and Hungary, whose constitutional systems can no longer be described as ‘liberal democracies’, face a deep crisis in the rule of law. Common to them is that the populists responsible for those crises came to power by placing particular emphasis on social issues in their election campaigns.

In my presentation I will try to provide answers to two research questions. (1) Do the examples of constitutional systems of Hungary and Poland confirm or disprove the hypothesis that there is a relationship between the constitutional socioeconomic status of an individual and the occurrence of the phenomenon of populism leading to the collapse of the rule of law? (2) Has a shift in the paradigm of protection of personal and political rights and freedoms, which took place in Poland and Hungary, been accompanied by a change in the paradigm of social and economic rights and freedoms and the mechanisms for their protection?