A URBAN STORYTELLING: HOW URBAN SPACES ENGAGE IN THE CONSTITUTIONAL NARRATIVE?

The occupation of the city, especially of its public spaces, turns possible meetings, protests and gives visibility to subjects and demands that are often ignored. It is not by chance that citizenship is a constitutive political condition of the subject in urban spaces and the city becomes a privileged space for political struggle. The very possibility of reunion in the city space thus constitutes both: a right of the citizen and a precondition for the exercise of other rights, including constitutional rights. This work seeks, therefore, to understand what is the role of urban manifestations in protecting the Constitution and, more than that, how can the occupation of urban space engage in the constitutional narrative. The hypothesis is that when protests take over the urban space with a shared language of rights, when they demand the fulfillment of the promises of the Constitution, they engage in the constitutional narrative and help to make this narrative concrete.